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Urban Forum

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 69–84 | Cite as

Including Women? (Dis)junctures Between Voice, Policy and Implementation in Integrated Development Planning

  • Alison TodesEmail author
  • Pearl Sithole
  • Amanda Williamson
Article

Abstract

Integrated development plans (IDPs) are municipal strategic plans designed to bring about developmental local government. They have been criticised for providing insufficient space for democratic participation. This paper explores the extent to which a marginalised group—women—has been incorporated into the IDP process, in response to three questions. First, how have IDP participatory processes incorporated women’s voice, and are the new participatory spaces realising their transformative potential? Secondly, how have women’s interests and a gender perspective been mainstreamed in the IDP, and has it promoted transformation? And finally, at the interface between officials and women themselves, how are IDP projects implemented and does agency promote or impede the goals of gender equality? A study of three KwaZulu-Natal municipalities reveals some achievements, but unequal gender relations have not been transformed. These case studies demonstrate some of the complexities and difficulties in the practice of democratic governance.

Keywords

Gender Women Planning IDPs KwaZulu-Natal Municipalities 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This publication was produced with the aid of a grant from the International Development Research Centre, Ottawa, Canada. The European Union’s Conferences Workshops and Funding Initiatives (CWCI) co-funded the public workshops where results were discussed. We wish to acknowledge the work of Nelisiwe Mngadi, Fikile Ndlovu, Sindisiwe Dlomo, Khanyasile Madizika, Jabu Ntuli and Zola Gasa, who assisted with the research and the workshops.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Todes
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pearl Sithole
    • 2
  • Amanda Williamson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Architecture and PlanningUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.Democracy and GovernanceHuman Sciences Research CouncilDurbanSouth Africa

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