Urban Forum

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 1–21 | Cite as

Motivation and Marginalization in African Urban Agriculture: The Case of Lusaka, Zambia

Article

Abstract

Urban agriculture in Africa has been identified as an important income generation and survival strategy among poor and not so poor households. However, official attitudes to urban agriculture vary considerably between and within different African countries. Recent field-based research undertaken in Lusaka, the capital of Zambia, reveals that urban agriculture makes a significant contribution to the food basket of many urban households in the city. Despite this contribution, urban agriculture in Lusaka has remained a peripheral issue in urban development strategies and planning policy. Interviews with urban farmers and professionals from various government departments and non-governmental organisations indicate that urban agriculture suffers from a number of factors such as a shortage of land and unsupportive official policy. This paper attempts to illuminate the patterns, processes and decision-making strategies associated with the production of foodstuffs for sale and/or household consumption. The extent to which urban agriculture is being supported or marginalized in Lusaka is examined in the context of evolving strategies for achieving sustainable urban development, poverty alleviation and food security.

Keywords

Urban agriculture Urbanization Marginalization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the valuable assistance of Mr. Ndiyoi and colleagues at the Farming Systems Association of Zambia for the use of office space and access to materials on agriculture in Lusaka and Zambia. We are also indebted to Mutinta Nabuyanda, Joseph Chalila, and staff at the Lusaka City Council, MAFF, and the University of Zambia who were involved at different stages of this study. Special thanks are also due to the many grassroots respondents and various non-governmental organizations, without whose help this study would not have been possible. Finally, we are deeply indebted to AGROPOLIS/IDRC (Canada) for a research grant of CA$ 19,976 awarded to Danny Simatele on 1 June 2005.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of SussexFalmer, BrightonUK
  2. 2.Department of GeographyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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