Advertisement

Bruner and Beyond: a Commentary

  • Nandita ChaudharyEmail author
  • Punya Pillai
Regular Article

Abstract

The philosophy of Bruner transcends traditional boundaries in the study of the human mind with a new kind of psychology, one that frees the thinking mind from its opposition to feelings and also from the limitations of being considered an ‘inside-the-head’ phenomenon. It is with active engagement with the outside world that a child develops its understanding. In this engagement with the outside world, the developmental construction of thought is actively created through the use of symbols. The cultural context, images, and languages a person experiences are thus considered to be formative in thinking. Opposing the notion of readiness, Bruner believed children to be capable of complex thought, and the dynamics of these developments were guided by meaning-making. The significance of meaning in Psychology was resurrected in his writing. Furthermore, the notion of narrative as constructive in facilitating the organisation and management of mental processes is invaluable. In this article, we bring a commentary on two articles, one that relates to the study of scaffolding of emotion regulation by parents of adolescents and the other on the narrative understanding of selfhood of individuals with autism.

Keywords

Bruner Narrative Meaning Self 

Notes

Compliance and Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interests

Author A declares that he/she has no conflict of interest. Author B declares that he/she has no conflict of interest.

Animals

No animals were used or mentioned.

Human Subjects

No human subjects were involved in the preparation of the article.

References

  1. Brockmeier, J., & Carbaugh, D. (2001). Introduction. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity (pp. 1–24). Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bruner, E. M. (1986). Ethnography as narrative. In V. Turner & E. W. Bruner (Eds.), The anthropology of experience (pp. 139–155). Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bruner, J. S. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bruner, J. S. (2001). Self-making and world-making. In J. Brockmeier & D. Carbaugh (Eds.), Narrative and identity (pp. 25–38). Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chaudhary, N. (2004). Listening to culture: Constructing reality through everyday talk. New Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  6. Demuth, C., Chaudhary, N., & Keller, H. (2011). Memories of me: Comparisons from Osnabrueck (Germany) and Delhi (India) students and their mothers. Integrative Psychological and Behavioural Sciences, 45(1), 48–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fasulo, A. (2019). A different conversation: The autistic self and narrative psychology. This volume. Google Scholar
  8. Feldman, C., Bruner, J., Kalmar, D., & Renderer, B. (1993). Plot, plight, and dramatism: Interpretation at three ages. Human Development, 36, 327–342.  https://doi.org/10.1159/000278220&gt.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Geertz, C. (1973). The interpretation of cultures. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  10. Hymes, D. (1996). Ethnography, linguistics, narrative inequality: Toward an understanding of voice. London: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  11. Salvatore, S. (2019). Beyond the meaning given: The meaning as Explanandum. This volume. Google Scholar
  12. Tuli, M. (2014). Parental reconstructions about the care and development of young children. In N. Chaudhary, S. Anandalakshmy, & J. Valsiner (Eds.), Cultural realities of being: Abstract ideas within everyday lives. USA: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Valsiner, J. (2014). Revealing the abstract in the concrete: Why India is our future? In N. Chaudhary, S. Anandalakshmy, & J. Valsiner (Eds.), Cultural realities of being: Abstract ideas within everyday lives. USA: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Childhood Studies, Lady Irwin CollegeUniversity of DelhiNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations