Journal of Labor Research

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 347–364 | Cite as

State and Regional Variation in the Effects of Trade on Job Displacement in the US Manufacturing Sector, 1982–1999

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Abstract

Worker-level data from the 1984–2000 Displaced Worker Surveys are employed to examine the effects of trade on manufacturing workers’ probabilities of job displacement. Observed changes in import and export penetration rates yield increases in displacement probabilities for the North Central, Middle Atlantic and South Central regions yet lower displacement probabilities for the Plains/West and Pacific regions. Changes in import and export price indexes lead to increases in displacement probabilities for the Pacific, Southeast and Northeast regions and decreases for the South Central and Middle Atlantic regions. However, while the influences of imports and exports on job displacement vary considerably across states and regions, the estimated net effect of trade on displacement probabilities is minor, generally speaking, when compared to the combined influence of other factors.

Keywords

Trade Job displacement State and regional variation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Funding for this project was provided through a grant from the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research and through the Franklin & Marshall College Hackman Scholars Program. Nathan Magnan provided excellent research assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Franklin & Marshall CollegeLancasterUSA

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