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Journal of Labor Research

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 555–595 | Cite as

What do unions do?—Evaluation and commentary

  • Bruce E. Kaufman
Article

Abstract

Most books in the social sciences quietly slip into oblivion soon after publication. Very few remain frequently cited 20 years later and only a handful merit a retrospective symposium. One of these books is Freeman and Medoff’s What Do Unions Do? When it was published, a reviewer (Mitchell, 1985: 253) labeled the book “a landmark in social science research.“ Two decades later this verdict still rings true. The authors of WDUD should be justifiably proud.

Keywords

Labor Market Collective Bargaining Industrial Relation Union Density Union Wage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce E. Kaufman
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia State UniversityAtlanta

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