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Journal of Labor Research

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 307–319 | Cite as

Learning from each other: A European perspective on American labor

  • Edmund Heery
Symposium the Future of Private Sector Unions in the United States: Part I

Keywords

European Union Collective Bargaining Industrial Relation Labor Movement Work Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edmund Heery
    • 1
  1. 1.Cardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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