Advertisement

Sexuality & Culture

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 121–134 | Cite as

Women’s Experiences of Female Ejaculation

  • Amy L. Gilliland
Original Paper

Abstract

Thirteen women responded to an open-ended questionnaire about their female ejaculation experiences. Responses are described from a phenomenological perspective. The major themes of responses include feelings of humiliation and shame or feelings of exploration and wonder, moving towards acceptance or acceptance tinged with resignation. Women explain their relationships to their bodies as well as their relationship to the ejaculation fluids and how this affects their sexual identities. The origins of their sexual fluids are mysterious. The stimulation needed for ejaculation differed among respondents, and was also found to occur separately from orgasm for some women. Ejaculation began at one of two distinct time points in the life course. This study supports the existence of female ejaculation as a common experience for some women, and proposes new areas for further exploration.

Keywords

Ejaculation Women’s sexuality Sexual fluid Women Female prostate Phenomenology Orgasm G-spot Multiple orgasm Female sexual experience 

References

  1. Addiego, F., Belzer, E., Comolli, J., Moger, W., Perry, J., & Whipple, B. (1981). Female ejaculation: A case study. The Journal of Sex Research, 17(1), 13–21.Google Scholar
  2. Belzer, E., Whipple, B., & Moger, W. (1984). On female ejaculation. The Journal of Sex Research, 20(4), 403–406.Google Scholar
  3. Bullough, B., David, M., Whipple, B., Dixon, J., Allgeier, E. R., & Drury, K. C. (1984). Subjective reports of female orgasmic explulsion of fluid. Nurse Practitioner, 9, 55–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cabello, F. (1997, 25–27 June). Female ejaculation: myths and reality. Paper presented at the proceedings of the 13th world congress of sexology, Valencia, Spain.Google Scholar
  5. Chalker, R. (2000). The clitoral truth. New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar
  6. Darling, C. A., Davidson, J. K., & Conway-Welch, C. (1990). Female ejaculation: Perceived origins, the Grafenberg spot/area, and sexual responsiveness. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 19(1), 29–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Davidson, J. K. D., Carol, A., & Conway-Welch, C. (1989). The role of the Grafenberg Spot and female ejaculation in the female orgasmic response: An empirical analysis. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 15(2), 102–120.Google Scholar
  8. Giorgi, A. (1997). The theory, practice, and evaluation of the phenomenological method as a qualitative research procedure. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 28(2), 235–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Goldberg, D., Whipple, B., Fishkin, R., Waxman, H., Fink, P., & Weisberg, M. (1983). The Grafenberg spot and female ejaculation: A review of initial hypotheses. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 3(1), 27–37.Google Scholar
  10. Heath, D. (1984). An investigation into the origins of a copious vaginal discharge during intercourse: “Enough to wet the bed - that is not urine”. Journal of Sex Research, 20, 194–210.Google Scholar
  11. Hines, T. M. (2001). The G-spot: A modern gynecologic myth. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 185(2), 359–362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Ladas, A., Whipple, B., & Perry, J. D. (1982). The G spot and other recent discoveries about human sexuality. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  13. Masters, W. H., & Johnson, V. (1966). Human Sexual Response. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.Google Scholar
  14. Masters, W., Johnson, V., & Kolodny, R. (1988). Human Sexuality (3rd ed.). Glenview, Illinois: Scott, Foresman.Google Scholar
  15. Masters, W., Johnson, V., & Kolodny, R. (1992). Human sexuality (4th ed.). New York: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
  16. Perry, J., & Whipple, B. (1981). Pelvic muscle strength of female ejaculators: Evidence in support of a new theory of orgasm. The Journal of Sex Research, 17(1), 22–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Sevely, J. L., & Bennett, J. W. (1978). Concerning female ejaculation and the female prostate. The Journal of Sex Research, 14(1), 1–20.Google Scholar
  18. Speigelberg, H. (1965). The Phenomenological Movement (2nd ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  19. Sundahl, D. (2003). Female Ejaculation and the G-Spot. Alameda: Hunter House.Google Scholar
  20. Van Manen, M. (1990). Researching lived experience: Human science for an action sensitive pedagogy. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  21. Whipple, B. & Komisaruk, B. R. (1991). The G spot, orgasm, and female ejaculation: Are they related? Paper presented at the proceedings of the first international conference on orgasm, Bombay, India.Google Scholar
  22. Whipple, B., & Komisaruk, B. R. (1992). The G-spot, vaginal orgasm, and female ejaculation: A review of research and literature. In W. Bezemer (Ed.), Sex Matters (pp. 33–36). USA: Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.Google Scholar
  23. Whipple, B., & Komisaruk, B. R. (1999). Beyond the G-spot: Recent research on female sexuality. Psychiatric Annals, 29(1), 34–37.Google Scholar
  24. Winks, C. (1998). The good vibrations guide: the G-spot. San Francisco: Down There Press.Google Scholar
  25. Zaviacic, M. (1984a). Enzyme histochemistry of the adult human female prostate: Acid phosphatase distribution. Cellular and Molecular Biology, 30, 545–551.Google Scholar
  26. Zaviacic, M. (1984b). Enzyme histochemistry of the adult human female prostate: Hydrolase and dehydrogenase distribution. Cellular and Molecular Biology, 30, 537–543.Google Scholar
  27. Zaviacic, M. (1999). The human female prostate. In Vestigial Skene’s paraurethral glands and ducts to woman’s functional prostate (pp. 1–171). Bratislava (Slovakia): Slovak Academic Press.Google Scholar
  28. Zaviacic, M., & Ablin, R. J. (2000). The female prostate and prostate-specific antigen. Immunohistochemical localization, implications of this prostate marker in women and reasons for using the term “prostate” in the human female. Histology and Histopathology, 15(1), 131–142.Google Scholar
  29. Zaviacic, M., Dolezalova, S., Holoman, I., Zaviacicova, A., Mikulecky, M., & Brazdil, V. (1988a). Concentrations of fructose in female ejaculate and urine: A comparative biochemical study. The Journal of Sex Research, 24, 319–325.Google Scholar
  30. Zaviacic, M., Zaviacicova, A., Holoman, I., & Molcan, J. (1988b). Female urethral expulsions evoked by local digital stimulation of the G-spot: Differences in the response patterns. Journal of Sex Research, 24, 311–318.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Wisconsin MadisonMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations