Advertisement

Trends in Organized Crime

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 362–364 | Cite as

Stephen R. Schneider, Iced: the story of organized crime in Canada

Mississauga, Ontario: John Wiley & Sons, Canada, 2009, 608 pp.; CAN $29.95 (softcover), ISBN: 978-0-470-83500-5
  • Cameron N. McIntosh
Article
  • 150 Downloads

Stephen Schneider’s book, Iced: The Story of Organized Crime in Canada, ended up being twice as long as he originally planned, with a bibliography that necessitated a separate online document (freely downloadable at: http://www.blindsidemedia.net/iced/Bibliography.pdf). None of this is surprising, however, given the scope of the material he set out to consolidate in this impressive chronicle of Canada’s underworld.

The first stop for Schneider’s time machine is the late 1500s, where he details the exploits of Canada’s premier criminal organizations: pirates off the Eastern seaboard. When we arrive in the 19th century, we meet the various gangs of thieves and smugglers who plied their trade on the Canadian plains, as well as a number of fraudsters who operated in larger urban centers. The second part of the book takes us through the dark side of the early 20th century, beginning with the terrorization of Italian immigrant communities by the infamous “Black Hand” extortionists, moving on...

Notes

Disclaimer

Although the author is an employee of Public Safety Canada, the views expressed herein are his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Public Safety Canada or the Government of Canada.

References

  1. CBC (2000) News July 5. Crown cuts deal to end Manitoba gang trial. Accessed April 19, 2010 at: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2000/07/05/mba_warriors000705.html#ixzz0lYlH47Fn
  2. Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (2004) 2004 Annual report on organized crime in Canada. Criminal Intelligence Service Canada, Ottawa. Accessed April 19, 2010 at: http://www.cisc.gc.ca/annual_reports/annual_report_2004/frontpage_2004_e.html
  3. Grekul JM, LaBoucane-Benson P (2008) Aboriginal gangs and their (dis)placement: contextualizing recruitment, membership, and status. Can J Criminol Crim Justice 50(1):59–82CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Morselli C, Turcotte M, Tenti V (2010) Mobility of criminal groups. Ottawa, ON: Public Safety CanadaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Law Enforcement and Policing BranchPublic Safety CanadaOttawaCanada

Personalised recommendations