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Trends in Organized Crime

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 3–18 | Cite as

Countering narcotics and organized crime in the Baltic region

  • Klas Kärrstrand
  • Anna Jonsson
Regional Report
  • 189 Downloads

This article seeks to present a tentative account of organized crime and narcotics trafficking in the Baltic region as well as providing some recommendations on how to enhance regional cooperation in countering these threats. The article builds on previous research and on information provided by researchers and law enforcement personnel participating in the Silk Road Studies Program Workshop “Countering narcotics and Organized Crime in the Baltic Sea Region” held in Riga, Latvia, December 12–13, 2006. The workshop, sponsored by the Swedish National Drug Policy Coordinator, brought together law enforcement personnel and researchers from Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden. During two days the participants made an assessment of recent developments and trends concerning narcotics smuggling and organized crime in the region, and discussed potential consequences for the social, economic, legal and political development, especially in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, but also for...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science & Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Eurasian StudiesUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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