Trends in Organized Crime

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 44–92 | Cite as

Assessing transnational organized crime: Results of a pilot survey of 40 selected organized criminal groups in 16 countries

United Nations Centre for International Crime Prevention
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References

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© Springer 2002

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