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White Evangelical Activism and the Gender Divide in the 2016 Presidential Election

  • Elizabeth Monk-TurnerEmail author
Symposium: Politics Redux in the United States

Abstract

Social scientists have proposed various explanations of why Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election including racism, dissatisfaction among white collar workers—especially in rust belt states, Russian interference, Facebook ads, and Christian Nationalism. In the current work, we look to Donald Trump’s core base, white evangelicals, to better understand the 2016 election outcome. White evangelicals believe that men and women are different--and that men are natural leaders. Traditional white evangelicals, both women and men, accept the idea that women are responsible for home and family life and recognize male authority in both private and public spheres. Evangelical religious activism defines the Trump presidency and allows an understanding of why many women support this president and why the abortion issue is central to their cause. Evangelical religious activism brings two questions to the forefront: how do we understand the separation of church and state (as a religious precept—outlawing abortion aims to define a civic society) as well as how embedded sexism and misogyny are within our culture.

Keywords

Elections Evangelicals Hillary Clinton Gender 

Notes

Futher Reading

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sociology/CJOld Dominion UniversityNorfolkUSA

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