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Society

, Volume 56, Issue 2, pp 130–134 | Cite as

Hospitality Happens: Dialogic Ethics of Care

  • Christine S. DavisEmail author
Symposium: Hostility to Hospitality
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

This essay responds to Balboni and Balboni’s 2019 book, Hostility to Hospitality: Spirituality and Professional Socialization within Medicine. In contrast to Balboni and Balboni’s argument that spirituality and medicine are oppositional tensions, I argue that medical care is itself an inherent manifestation of spirituality. The concept of “person-centered medicine” represents enhanced interpersonal relationships between patients and practitioners and leads to an appreciation of the personhood and inherent humanness of patients and their families. I explain ‘dialogic ethics of care,’ and claim that the hospital space is a community of dialogue, hospitality, and holiness; of love as a verb.

Keywords

Dialogue Person-centered medicine Dialogic ethics of care Spirituality Palliative care 

Notes

Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Communication StudiesUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA

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