Society

, Volume 46, Issue 6, pp 496–503

The New Virtual (Inter)Face of African Pentecostalism

Global Perspectives on Pentecostalism
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Abstract

In the absence of research on religion and the Internet in Africa, this paper examines select African Pentecostal ministries that are developing websites as a major new interface for interacting with their membership, with potential converts, competing or partnering religious groups, and organs of the media and the state. It argues that this new media platform constitutes an important site for the constitution of Pentecostal leadership in the contemporary African and diasporic contexts.

Keywords

Pentecostalism Africa Internet Cyberspace Media Mediation Websites Leadership Mega-churches Global networks Diaspora 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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