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Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 299–319 | Cite as

From Radicalism to Representation: Jose “Cha Cha“ Jimenez’s Journey into Electoral Politics

  • Marisol V. RiveraEmail author
  • Judson L. Jeffries
ARTICLES
  • 38 Downloads

Abstract

This article examines Jose “Cha Cha” Jimenez’s 1975 aldermanic campaign and his work toward the successful election of the first African American mayor of Chicago. Several progressive politicians who cut their political teeth on Jimenez’s city council campaign used the skills they acquired in the mid-1970s to break through the political glass ceiling that for decades kept Latinos from actualizing their potential. This article provides a lens through which to see how Jimenez and the Young Lords laid the groundwork for an anti-Daley machine that was a continuation of the original Rainbow Coalition.

Keywords

Alderman race Young Lords Jose “Cha Cha” Jimenez Rainbow Coalition Electoral politics 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Elgin Community CollegeElginUSA
  2. 2.The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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