Advertisement

Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 115–119 | Cite as

Body Image in a Sample of Adult African American Males and Females with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

  • Sheethal D. Reddy
  • Christopher L. EdwardsEmail author
  • Mary Wood
  • Keisha O’Garo
  • Kai Morgan
  • LeKisha Edwards
  • Chanté Wellington
  • Camela S. McDougald
  • Miriam Feliu
  • Janice McNeil
  • Keith E. Whitfield
Articles
  • 107 Downloads

Abstract

Sickle cell disease (SCD) affects developmental maturation causing a delay in secondary sex characteristics associated with puberty. There is little data on the impact of SCD on body image, a well-established risk factor for eating disorders among young women. Body dissatisfaction combined with environmental stressors and negative affect may place some men and women with SCD at a higher risk problematic eating behaviors or body change strategies in an attempt to achieve a more idealized body type. The present exploratory study examined the potential associations between SCD, body image, and eating disorders, and provided preliminary data to guide the directions of future investigations.

Keywords

Sickle cell disease Body image Pain Gender Body dissatisfaction 

Notes

Acknowledgement

We would like the thank Linda Weaver and the team in hematology for their efforts and support in completing the current research project.

References

  1. Clark, R., Coleman, A. P., & Novak, J. D. (2004). Brief report: initial psychometric properties of the everyday discrimination scale in Black adolescents. Journal of Adolescence, 3, 363–368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cohen, S., Kamarck, T., & Mermelstein, R. (1983). A global measure of perceived stress. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 24, 385–396.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Davies, S. C., & Gilmore, A. (2003). The role of hydroxyurea in the management of sickle cell disease. Blood Review, 17, 99–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Garner, D. M., Olmstead, M. P., & Polivy, J. (1983). Development and validation of a multidimensional eating disorder inventory for anorexia nervosa and bulimia. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 2, 15–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kaul, D. K., Fabry, M. E., & Nagel, R. L. (1996). The pathophysiology of vascular obstruction in the sickle syndrome. Blood Review, 10, 29–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kerns, R. D., Turk, D. C., & Rudy, T. E. (1985). The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI). Pain, 23, 345–356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Pells, J., Presnell, K., Edwards, C. L., Wood, M., Harrison, M. O., DeCastro, L., et al. (2005). Moderate chronic pain, weight, and dietary intake in African American adult patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Journal of the National Medical Association, 97(12), 1622–1629.Google Scholar
  8. Platt, O. S., Brambilla, D. J., Rosse, W. F., et al. (1994). Mortality in sickle cell disease: life expectancy and risk factors for early death. New England Journal of Medicine, 330, 1639–1644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Rodgers, G. P. (1997). Overview of pathophysiology and rationale for treatment of sickle cell anemia. Seminar in Hematology, 34, 2–7.Google Scholar
  10. Rubin, L. R., Fitts, M. L., & Becker, A. E. (2003). Whatever feels good in my soul: body ethics and aesthetics among African American and Latina women. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 27, 49–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Spillane, N. S., Boerner, L. M., Anderson, K. G., & Smith, G. T. (2004). Comparability of the EDI-2 between women and men. Assessment, 11, 85–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Stice, E. (2002). Role of body dissatisfaction in the onset and maintenance of eating pathology: a synthesis of research findings. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 110, 124–135.Google Scholar
  13. Wallston, K. A., Stein, M. J., & Smith, C. A. (1994). Form C of the MHLC scales: a condition-specific measure of locus of control. Journal of Personality Assessment, 63, 534–553.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheethal D. Reddy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher L. Edwards
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 10
    Email author
  • Mary Wood
    • 2
  • Keisha O’Garo
    • 5
  • Kai Morgan
    • 6
  • LeKisha Edwards
    • 2
  • Chanté Wellington
    • 2
  • Camela S. McDougald
    • 7
  • Miriam Feliu
    • 2
    • 4
  • Janice McNeil
    • 8
  • Keith E. Whitfield
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, Division of Medical PsychologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medicine, Division of HematologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Pain and Palliative Care CenterDuke University Medical CenterDurhamNCUSA
  5. 5.VA CT Healthcare SystemYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyUniversity of the West IndiesMonaJamaica
  7. 7.Department of PsychologyEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  8. 8.School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboroUSA
  9. 9.Department of PsychologyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  10. 10.Biofeedback Laboratory and Pediatric Neuropsychology ServiceDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

Personalised recommendations