Journal of African American Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 87–105 | Cite as

African American Males’ Student Engagement: A Comparison of Good Practices by Institutional Type

  • Terrell Lamont Strayhorn
  • James Michael DeVita
Articles

Abstract

Previous college impact studies attempt to estimate the impact of college on African American collegians as a whole. That is, most researchers study Black students as if they represent a monolithic group with similar inputs, experiences, and outcomes. Yet, a growing body of research provides compelling evidence that there are significant within group differences. Using three principles of good practices in undergraduate education defined by Chickering and Gamson (AAHE Bulletin 39:3–7, 1987), this study examined differences in African American males’ (N = 149) engagement by institutional type. A single significant predictor was found; Black men attending master’s institutions have a significant advantage over their counterparts at liberal arts colleges with respect to cooperation among students, controlling for an array of confounding factors. This study provides empirical support for the use of good practices in undergraduate education, particularly among African American men, and has important implications for future practice, policy, and research.

Keywords

Good practices African American Male Engagement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terrell Lamont Strayhorn
    • 1
  • James Michael DeVita
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Tennessee, KnoxvilleKnoxvilleUSA

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