Religious Coping and Pain Associated With Sickle Cell Disease: Exploration of a Non-linear Model

  • Cara F. O’Connell-Edwards
  • Christopher L. Edwards
  • Michele Pearce
  • Amy B. Wachholtz
  • Mary Wood
  • Malik Muhammad
  • Brittani Leach-Beale
  • Rebecca Shelby
  • Camela S. McDougald
  • M. Ojinga Harrison
  • Miriam Feliu
  • Lekisha Y. Edwards
  • Keith E. Whitfield
  • Marcellus Merritt
  • Chante’ Wellington
  • Goldie Byrd
  • Janice C. McNeil
  • Henry Edmonds
  • Elwood Robinson
Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s12111-008-9063-4

Cite this article as:
O’Connell-Edwards, C.F., Edwards, C.L., Pearce, M. et al. J Afr Am St (2009) 13: 1. doi:10.1007/s12111-008-9063-4

Abstract

The current study tested a non-linear model of religious coping among Black patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). We predicted that moderate prayer and church attendance would be associated with less severe affective and sensory ratings of pain, lower levels of psychopathology, and less frequent care utilization. The participants were 67 SCD patients, mean age 36.82 ± 11.47 (range 18–70) of which 45% were men. Using ANOVA procedures, our results indicated a main effect for the frequency of prayer which showed significant differences for anxiety and hostility. Post-hoc t tests revealed that participants who endorsed moderate frequency of prayer reported significantly less anxiety and hostility, relative to participants who reported high or low frequency of prayer. However, participants who endorsed moderate levels of prayer also reported a significantly higher frequency of visits to the emergency department, relative to participants who reported high or low frequency of prayer. However, reports of pain and psychopathology were more linear with participants who reported the highest frequency of church attendance having the highest reports, moderate among those with moderate frequency of church attendance, and lowest among those with infrequent church attendance. These findings challenge and extend the traditional linear conceptualization of religious coping on clinical outcomes among patients with SCD. Directions for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Sickle cell disease Religious coping Prayer Church attendance Chronic illness 

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cara F. O’Connell-Edwards
    • 1
  • Christopher L. Edwards
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 12
  • Michele Pearce
    • 2
  • Amy B. Wachholtz
    • 2
  • Mary Wood
    • 2
  • Malik Muhammad
    • 2
  • Brittani Leach-Beale
    • 5
  • Rebecca Shelby
    • 2
  • Camela S. McDougald
    • 2
  • M. Ojinga Harrison
    • 2
  • Miriam Feliu
    • 2
  • Lekisha Y. Edwards
    • 2
  • Keith E. Whitfield
    • 6
  • Marcellus Merritt
    • 7
  • Chante’ Wellington
    • 2
  • Goldie Byrd
    • 8
  • Janice C. McNeil
    • 9
  • Henry Edmonds
    • 10
  • Elwood Robinson
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, Division of Medical PsychologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Pain and Palliative Care CenterDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medicine, Division of HematologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Xavier UniversityNew OrleansUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Wisconsin MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  8. 8.Department of BiologyNorth Carolina A&T State UniversityGreensboroUSA
  9. 9.School of NursingUniversity of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboroUSA
  10. 10.Alzheimer’s Research CenterDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  11. 11.Department of PsychologyNorth Carolina Central UniversityDurhamUSA
  12. 12.Chronic Pain Management ProgramDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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