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The American Sociologist

, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 121–135 | Cite as

Recent writings on Robert K Merton: a Listing and some Observations

  • Charles CrothersEmail author
Article
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Abstract

Death and the advent of a variety of anniversaries are occasions when a discipline reflects on the accomplishments of its members, propounded by host universities, scholarly associations, focused conferences, journals, as well as the more normal course of the unfolding of a scholar’s influence. The paper attempts to assemble Robert K Merton’s posthumous publications together with the array of works directly relating to his body of sociological work. While it might be expected that particular themes would continue and this indeed occurs, there is also a wide range of attention to a large variety of Merton’s work, including the launching of his emergent interest in sociological semantics. The assemblage of material suggests that Merton’s work will continue to play an important role in inspiring sociological research.

Keywords

Robert K Merton Publications Archives Oral histories Obituaries Memorial volumes History of sociology 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social SciencesAuckland University of TechnologyAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.University of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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