The American Sociologist

, Volume 36, Issue 3–4, pp 46–65 | Cite as

Guide for the perplexed: On Michael Burawoy’s “public sociology”

  • Steven Brint

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Copyright information

© Transaction Publishers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Brint
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaRiverside

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