Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 87–89 | Cite as

1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of inactive form of P1 endolysin Lyz

  • Maruthi Kashyap
  • Zeenia Jagga
  • Bhaba Krishna Das
  • Arulandu Arockiasamy
  • Neel Sarovar Bhavesh
Article

Abstract

Lysozyme (Lyz) encoded by phage P1 is required for host cell lysis upon infection. Lyz has a N-terminal Signal Anchor Release (SAR) domain, responsible for its secretion into the periplasm and for its accumulation in a membrane tethered inactive form. Here, we report sequence-specific 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments for secreted inactive form of Lyz at pH 4.5.

Keywords

Phage P1 Endolysin Cell lysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Department of Biotechnology, Government of India for providing financial support for the 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers at the ICGEB, New Delhi and NII, New Delhi. MK is a recipient of Indian Council for Medical Research (ICMR) junior research fellowship. ZJ is recipient of University Grants Commission (UGC) junior research fellowship. BKD is a recipient of Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) junior research fellowship. This study is supported by grants to AA and NSB from DBT and ICGEB core funds. Prof. Ry Young kindly provided the overexpression constructs of Lyz and Lyzi. We thank Harshesh Bhatt for the software support. Initial work on the project was done by Arun K. Tharkeshwar.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maruthi Kashyap
    • 1
  • Zeenia Jagga
    • 1
  • Bhaba Krishna Das
    • 1
  • Arulandu Arockiasamy
    • 1
  • Neel Sarovar Bhavesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Structural and Computational Biology groupInternational Center for Genetic Engineering and BiotechnologyNew DelhiIndia

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