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Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 47–50 | Cite as

Backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for an archaeal homolog of the endonuclease Nob1 involved in ribosome biogenesis

  • Thomas Veith
  • Jan Philip Wurm
  • Elke Duchardt-Ferner
  • Benjamin Weis
  • Roman Martin
  • Charlotta Safferthal
  • Markus T. Bohnsack
  • Enrico Schleiff
  • Jens WöhnertEmail author
Article

Abstract

Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the concerted action of ~200 auxiliary protein factors on the nascent ribosome. For many of these factors structural and functional information is still lacking. The endonuclease Nob1 has been recently identified in yeast as the enzyme responsible for the final cytoplasmatic trimming step of the pre-18S rRNA during the biogenesis of the small ribosomal subunit. Here we report the NMR resonance assignments for a Nob1 homolog from the thermophilic archeon Pyrococcus horikoshii as a prerequisite for further structural studies of this class of proteins.

Keywords

NMR-assignments Triple resonance experiments Nob1 Ribosome biogenesis Endonuclease 18S rRNA maturation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Dr. Christian Richter for his generous support with regard to the NMR instrumentation, Nina A. Christ for help with TALOS+ and Dr. Oliver Ohlenschläger for helpful discussions. The eNMR project (European FP7 e-Infrastructure grant, contract no. 213010, www.enmr.eu), supported by the national GRID Initiatives of Italy, Germany and the Dutch BiG Grid project (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research) is acknowledged for the use of web portals, computing and storage facilities. This project was supported by an Aventis Foundation Professorship (to J.W.), the Center of Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, the Cluster of Excellence Frankfurt “Macromolecular Complexes”, the SFB 902 “Molecular mechanisms of RNA-based regulation” and the Förderfonds of the Goethe University Frankfurt/Main.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Veith
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jan Philip Wurm
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elke Duchardt-Ferner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Benjamin Weis
    • 1
  • Roman Martin
    • 1
  • Charlotta Safferthal
    • 1
  • Markus T. Bohnsack
    • 1
    • 3
  • Enrico Schleiff
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jens Wöhnert
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Institut für Molekulare BiowissenschaftenJohann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/MFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.Center of Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ)Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt/MGermany
  3. 3.Cluster of Excellence “Macromolecular Complexes”Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt/MGermany
  4. 4.Center of Membrane Proteomics (CMP)Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt/MGermany

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