Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 245–248

NMR assignments of ubiquitin fold domain (UFD) in SUMO-activating enzyme subunit 2 from rice

  • Rintaro Suzuki
  • Wataru Tsuchiya
  • Heisaburo Shindo
  • Toshimasa Yamazaki
Article

Abstract

The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a ubiquitin-like post-translational modifier that alters the localization, activity, or stability of many proteins. In the sumoylation process, an activated SUMO is transferred from SUMO-activating enzyme E1 complex (SAE1/SAE2) to SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 (Ubc9). Among the multiple domains in E1, a C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (UFD) of SAE2 shows high affinity for Ubc9, implying that UFD will be functionally important. We report NMR chemical shift assignments of UFD in SAE2 from rice. Almost all the resonances of UFD were assigned uniquely, representing a single conformation of UFD in solution. This is a contrast to the previous report for the corresponding UFD of human SAE2 which shows two conformational states. The secondary structure prediction of UFD in rice SAE2 shows the similar overall structure to the crystal structures of UFD in other E1 proteins such as SAE2 of human and yeast, ubiquitin-activating enzyme of yeast, and NEDD8-activating enzyme E1 catalytic subunit of human. Concomitantly, differences in the length of helices, strands, and loops are observed, particularly in the binding region to E2, supposing the variation in the UFD-E2 binding mode which may play a critical role in determining E1-E2 specificity.

Keywords

UFD SAE2 SUMO Rice NMR 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rintaro Suzuki
    • 1
  • Wataru Tsuchiya
    • 1
  • Heisaburo Shindo
    • 1
  • Toshimasa Yamazaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Protein Research UnitNational Institute of Agrobiological SciencesTsukuba, IbarakiJapan

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