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Biomolecular NMR Assignments

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 115–118 | Cite as

NMR resonance assignments of an engineered neomycin-sensing riboswitch RNA bound to ribostamycin and tobramycin

  • Sina R. Schmidtke
  • Elke Duchardt-Ferner
  • Julia E. Weigand
  • Beatrix Suess
  • Jens WöhnertEmail author
Article

Abstract

The neomycin-sensing riboswitch is an engineered riboswitch developed to regulate gene expression in vivo in the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon binding to neomycin B. With a size of only 27nt it is the smallest functional riboswitch element identified so far. It binds not only neomycin B but also related aminoglycosides of the 2′-deoxystreptamine class with high affinity. The regulatory activity, however, strongly depends on the identity of the aminoglycoside. As a prerequisite for the structure determination of riboswitch-ligand complexes we report here the 1H, 15N, 13C and partial 31P chemical shift assignments for the minimal functional 27nt neomycin sensing riboswitch RNA in complex with the 4,5-linked neomycin analog ribostamycin and the 4,6-linked aminoglycoside tobramycin.

Keywords

RNA NMR-assignments Triple resonance experiments Riboswitch Aminoglycosides Gene expression/regulation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Sabine Häfner and Matthias Görlach for a generous gift of T7-RNA-polymerase and Christian Richter for excellent technical support. We are grateful to the Center of Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) of the Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-University Frankfurt and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) (grants WO 901/1-2 to J. W. and SU 402/4-1 to B.S.) for financial support. J. W. and B. S. are recipients of Aventis Foundation endowed professorships in Chemical Biology.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sina R. Schmidtke
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elke Duchardt-Ferner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julia E. Weigand
    • 1
  • Beatrix Suess
    • 1
  • Jens Wöhnert
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Institut für Molekulare BiowissenschaftenJohann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/MFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.Center of Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ)Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-University FrankfurtFrankfurtGermany

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