1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Bacillus subtilis yndB START domain

  • Kelly A. Mercier
  • Geoffrey A. Mueller
  • Thomas B. Acton
  • Rong Xiao
  • Gaetano T. Montelione
  • Robert Powers
Article

Abstract

The steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain is found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, with putative functions including signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, GTPase activation and thioester hydrolysis. Here we report the near complete 1H, 15N and 13C backbone and side chain NMR resonance assignments for the Bacillus subtilis START domain protein yndB.

Keywords

Bacillus subtilis Protein yndB START domain Lipid binding NMR Resonance assignments 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly A. Mercier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Geoffrey A. Mueller
    • 2
  • Thomas B. Acton
    • 3
  • Rong Xiao
    • 3
  • Gaetano T. Montelione
    • 3
  • Robert Powers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Structural BiologyNational Institute of Environmental Health SciencesDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Northeast Structural Genomics ConsortiumRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA

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