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Youth Gangs: Nationwide Impacts of Research on Public Policy

  • James C. HowellEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article examines the public policy benefits of gang research. In particular, the author highlights the benefits of longitudinal research on gang members in several cities and multi-city tracking of gang problems nationwide. Remarkably, the accumulated research led directly to expanded federally sponsored gang research, program development and program evaluations—a clear-cut case in which research influenced public policy.

Keywords

Gang Gang members Causes and correlates Immigration Longitudinal studies Risk factors Gang theories Gang programs Evidence-based programs Suppression 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Southern Criminal Justice Association 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Gang CenterTallahasseeUSA

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