American Journal of Criminal Justice

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 234–251 | Cite as

The Effect of Gang Perpetrated Crime on the Likelihood of Non-Lethal Victim Injury

Article

Abstract

Studies consistently find that gang members are involved in a disproportionately high rate of violence. The association between gangs and violence is largely based on the legal definition of violence, however. The current study moves beyond the legal definition of gang violence by examining the relationship between non-lethal gang involved incidents and the likelihood of victim injury, using pooled data (1992–2005) from the National Crime Victimization Survey. Overall, results reveal that gang members are not more likely than are non-gang members to injure their victims. When analyses are restricted to incidents involving injury, or incidents involving weapons, gang members are no more likely to more severely injure their victims than non-gang members. Strengths and limitations of the study are discussed.

Keywords

Gangs Victimization Violence Injury 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank T.J. Taylor, Brian Payne, and the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. We are solely responsible for any errors or omissions that remain.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminal JusticeMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.University of Missouri-St. LouisSt. LouisUSA

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