Advertisement

Abandoned Babies at Tertiary Care Rural Medical College Hospital: The Indian Scenarios

  • Aritra Guha
  • Akash Rai
  • Dipankar Gupta
  • Rakesh MondalEmail author
Original Article
  • 6 Downloads

Abstract

Objectives

In India, girls are sex-selectively abandoned. The abandoned babies are brought to the nearest hospital under the jurisdiction of the administration. The authors aimed to study the demographic data and disease profile of those babies.

Methods

In this hospital-based, retrospective, descriptive study, authors studied all the abandoned babies who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics as “unknown” and cared for over the last 3 y. Their case records were analyzed with an appropriate statistical measure.

Results

Out of 11 babies, girl-boy ratio was 2.6:1, 73% being abandoned in the neonatal period with a survival rate of 91%. Six babies (54.5%) required emergency intervention at admission. Hospital stay was higher in girls with mean discharge time being 106 d, although the mean fit for discharge time was 6.5 d.

Conclusions

This study is the first of its kind on abandoned babies demographic data and disease profile, highlighting the burden of abandoned babies in the hospital.

Keywords

Abandon Adoption Children Girl child 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the help of The Head of the Department, Department of Pediatrics, North Bengal Medical College Hospital, Sushrutanagar, Darjeeling, West Bengal and The Medical Superintendent Cum Vice-Principal, North Bengal Medical College Hospital, Sushrutanagar, Darjeeling, West Bengal.

Contributions

AG: Primary investigator, data collection, making draft of the manuscript; AR: Data collection, literature search, drafting the manuscript; DG: Study design, review draft, analysis; RM: Conception of study, reviewing draft, study design. AG and RM shall act as guarantor of the study.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

None.

Source of Funding

None.

References

  1. 1.
    Sinha A, Lombe M, Saltzman LY, Whetten K, Whetten R. Exploring factors associated with educational outcomes for orphan and abandoned children in India. Glob Soc Welf. 2016;3:23–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    UNICEF. UNICEF state of the worlds children: children in an urban world. UNICEF; 2012. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/aids/files/SOWC_2012-Main_Report_EN_21Dec2011.pdf. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  3. 3.
    UNICEF. Child protection from violence, exploitation and abuse: Children without parental care. UNICEF; 2014. Available at:https://www.unicef.org/publicpartnerships/files/Child_Protection_from_Violence_Exploitation_and_Abuse_2013_Thematic_Report.pdf. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  4. 4.
    Whetten K, Ostermann J, Whetten RA, et al. A comparison of the wellbeing of orphans and abandoned children ages 6-12 in institutional and community-based care settings in 5 less wealthy nations. PLoS One. 2009;4:e8169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Girl-Child Endangered: Child Abandonment in India. Available at: https://www.soschildrensvillages.ca/girl-child-endangered-child-abandonment-india. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  6. 6.
    The Juvenile Justice Act, 1986. Available at: http://bathindapolice.in/files/JuvenileJusticeAct1986.pdf . Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  7. 7.
    Otieno PA, Nduati RW, Musoke RN, Wasunna AO. Growth and development of abandoned babies in institutional care in Nairobi. East Afr Med J. 1999;76:430–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Karaçam Z. Abandoned babies: examination of abandoned babies’ news in Turkey. Int J Womens Health Wellness. 2016;2:018.  https://doi.org/10.23937/2474-1353/1510018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Rai A. Government offers cradle for abandoned babies. Available at: https://www.indiatoday.in/mail-today/story/abadoned-babies-cradle-adoption-985098-2017-06-28. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  10. 10.
    Mehta MN. Physical abuse of abandoned children in India. Child Abuse Negl. 1982;6:171–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Behera C, Sikary AK, Krishna K, Garg A, Chopra S, Gupta S. Medico-legal autopsy of abandoned foetuses and newborns in India. Med Leg J. 2016;84:109–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015; Available at: http://cara.nic.in/PDF/JJ%20act%202015.pdf. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  13. 13.
    Adoption Procedure for Resident Indians. Available at: http://cara.nic.in/Parents/Guideline_RI.html. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  14. 14.
    Ministry Of Women And Child Development Notification. The Gazette Of India : Extraordinary [Part II—Sec. 3(i)] New Delhi, 2017 Jan 04. Available at: http://www.wcd.nic.in/sites/default/files/NTESCL_636194033071198891_english%20regulation_0.pdf. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.
  15. 15.
    The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Amendment Bill, 2018; Available at: http://164.100.47.4/BillsTexts/LSBillTexts/Asintroduced/137_2018_LS_Eng.pdf. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.

Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsNorth Bengal Medical CollegeDarjeelingIndia

Personalised recommendations