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Mandibular Physiotherapy for Trauma to the Temporomandibular Joint

  • Nakul Uppal
Commentary
  • 14 Downloads
Falls are common in the pediatric age group due to developing neuromuscular coordination and the nature of children’s activities. Trauma to the face is sustained on the lips and teeth. Often, the point of impact is the chin when the child stumbles and falls onto a hard surface. The child may present to the pediatrician with trismus and pain at the site of injury. Local examination reveals bruising or laceration on the chin. Trauma to the lips, gums and teeth may distract the pediatrician from a hidden site of trauma: the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). A fracture missed within the TMJ may complicate oral function due to malunion and may lead to ankylosis in the future which will deform the growing mandible [ 1] (Fig.  1).

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Informed Consent

“Informed consent was obtained from the individual participant included in this paper. No identifying information is included in this article.”

Conflict of Interest

None.

References

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Copyright information

© Dr. K C Chaudhuri Foundation 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Dentistry and Maxillofacial SurgeryAll India Institute of Medical SciencesRaipurIndia

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