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Clinical and Translational Oncology

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 225–233 | Cite as

MicroRNA-21 in breast cancer: diagnostic and prognostic potential

  • J. Chen
  • X. WangEmail author
Educational Series - Blue Series Advances in Translational Oncology

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and is considered as a complex and heterogeneous disease. The identification of novel biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer and prediction of disease outcome is urgently required. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that act to regulate gene expression and play vital roles in many crucial processes. Recent evidence demonstrates that miRNAs could emerge as revolutionary sources of biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. miR-21 is one of the most commonly observed aberrant miRNAs in a variety of cancers including breast cancer. Emerging studies show that miR-21 could be measured stably and easily in tumor tissues, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and blood circulation. In this review, we will summarize the current evidence of miR-21 as a promising biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis in breast cancer. We will also discuss the issues and challenges of miR-21 as a potential biomarker in future clinical applications.

Keywords

MicroRNA-21 Breast cancer Biomarker Diagnosis Prognosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the grant of Medical Sciences and Technology of Zhejiang Province (No. 2013KYA026).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they do not have any conflict of interests.

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Copyright information

© Federación de Sociedades Españolas de Oncología (FESEO) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology (Breast)Zhejiang Cancer HospitalHangzhouChina

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