Clinical and Translational Oncology

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 138–142 | Cite as

Examination of Smad2 and Smad4 copy-number variations in skin cancers

  • Yong Shao
  • Jie Zhang
  • Richu Zhang
  • Jun Wan
  • Wei Zhang
  • Bo Yu
Research Articles

Abstract

Background

Smad2 and Smad4 transcription factors were identified as the signalling mediators of transforming growth factor β (TGF β) pathway. Copy number variations (CNVs) have been discovered to have phenotypic consequences and be associated with various types of cancers. CNVs of Smad2 and Smad4 were found to be associated with cancer pathogenesis in the recent array-based study. However, no such study has been performed in skin cancer yet. In this study, we aim to examine the CNVs of Smad2 and Smad4 in skin samples.

Methods

A total of 195 paired samples including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and actinic keratosis (AK) were included. Real-time PCR was used for the quantifi cation of Smad2 and Smad4 copy numbers.

Results

CNVs of Smad2 showed statistical differences between cancer samples (both SCC and BCC) and normal tissues (p<0.05). For Smad4, statistical difference was observed only in SCC samples (p=0.014), but not in BCC and AK samples (p=0.173 and 0.314, respectively). Association analysis showed that the frequencies of Smad2 and Smad4 CNVs were correlated with the severity of skin abnormalities (p=0.002 for Smad2 and p=0.029 for Smad4).

Conclusions

CNVs of Smad2 are associated with SCC and BCC, while CNVs of Smad4 are associated with SCC but not BCC.

Keywords

Smad2 Smad4 Copy number variations Basal cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma Actinic keratosis 

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Copyright information

© Feseo 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong Shao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jie Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Richu Zhang
    • 4
  • Jun Wan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Wei Zhang
    • 1
    • 5
    • 6
  • Bo Yu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Shenzhen Key Lab for Translational Medicine of DermatologyShenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical CenterShenzhen, GuangdongChina
  2. 2.Biomedical Research InstituteShenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical CenterShenzhen, GuangdongChina
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyShenzhen Hospital Peking UniversityShenzhen, GuangdongChina
  4. 4.Department of General SurgeryTaizhou Municipal HospitalZhejiang ProvinceChina
  5. 5.Division of Life ScienceHong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong KongChina
  6. 6.JNU-HKUST Joint LabJi-Nan UniversityGuangdongChina

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