Clinical and Translational Oncology

, Volume 13, Issue 10, pp 760–763 | Cite as

Prevention of acute radiation enteritis: efficacy and tolerance of glutamine

  • Ismael Membrive Conejo
  • Ana Reig Castillejo
  • Nuria Rodríguez de Dios
  • Palmira Foro Arnalot
  • Javier Sanz Latiesas
  • Joan Lozano Galán
  • Martí Lacruz Bassols
  • Jaime Quera Jordana
  • Enric Fernández-Velilla Cepria
  • Manuel Algara López
Research Articles

Abstract

Purpose

Our primary endpoint is to determine the effect of L-glutamine Resource (Nestlé Healthcare Nutrition) in the prevention of induced enteritis after pelvic radiotherapy (RT).

Methods

We observed the incidence of diarrhoea during and after pelvic radiation therapy in patients receiving L-glutamine Resource (Nestlé Healthcare Nutrition) supplementation. To assess results, patients were stratified according to prior treatment (prior surgery and/or concomitant chemotherapy, or no prior or concomitant treatment).

Results

Incidence of diarrhoea observed is similar to published series in which glutamine is not administered. Grade 1 intestinal toxicity was observed in 4 patients (15.4%), grade 2 in 10 patients (38.4%) and grade 3 in 5 patients (19.2%). Mean dose of RT at the start of enteritis was 23.55 Gy (12–40). No grade 4 toxicity occurred and in 7 patients (27%) no toxicity was reported. No differences in toxicity incidence were observed between RT dose levels.

Conclusions

Administration of glutamine to patients during pelvic RT does not appear to prevent the incidence of enteritis (diarrhoea). No differences were observed between patients who underwent concomitant chemotherapy (where you would expect an increase in toxicity) and those who did not.

Keywords

Pelvis Radiotherapy Toxicity Enteritis Glutamine 

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Copyright information

© Feseo 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ismael Membrive Conejo
    • 1
  • Ana Reig Castillejo
    • 1
  • Nuria Rodríguez de Dios
    • 1
  • Palmira Foro Arnalot
    • 1
  • Javier Sanz Latiesas
    • 1
  • Joan Lozano Galán
    • 1
  • Martí Lacruz Bassols
    • 1
  • Jaime Quera Jordana
    • 1
  • Enric Fernández-Velilla Cepria
    • 1
  • Manuel Algara López
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyHospital de l’EsperançaBarcelonaSpain

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