Clinical and Translational Oncology

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 228–236

Screening practice and misplaced priorities

  • Davide Mauri
  • Antonis Valachis
  • Nikolaos P. Polyzos
  • Ivan Cortinovis
  • Vassiliki Karampoiki
  • Evridiki Loukidou
  • Paraskevi Alevizaki
  • Konstantinos Kamposioras
  • Georgios Kouris
  • Parthenopi Alexandropoulou
  • Lamprini Tsali
  • Charalampos Panou
  • Athanasios Stamatelopoulos
  • Velisarios Lakiotis
  • Anastasia Spiliopoulou
  • Aikaterini Terzoudi
  • Aliki Ioakimidou
  • Ioanna Karathanasi
  • Magdalini Bristianou
  • Giovanni Casazza
  • Nicholas Pavlidis
Research Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s12094-009-0345-7

Cite this article as:
Mauri, D., Valachis, A., Polyzos, N.P. et al. Clin Transl Oncol (2009) 11: 228. doi:10.1007/s12094-009-0345-7

Abstract

Purpose

To estimate cancer screening coverage among a large sample of Greek individuals.

Methods

7012 adults from 30 Hellenic areas were surveyed. Tests included: faecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, chest X-ray, urine test, testicular examination, trans-rectal ultrasound, full blood count, skin examination, digital rectal examination, PSA, Pap test, mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), self breast examination and breast ultrasound.

Results

Eighty-eight percent of males and 93% of females declared being interested in cancer screening; 37.8% of men and 37.9% of women had had a medical consultation for screening purpose in the previous 2 years. Less than 2% reported having received screening for colorectal cancer or skin malignancies. Screening for cervical cancer, mammography and CBE was reported by 39.6%, 22.8% and 27.9% of females respectively. Twenty percent of males reported screening for prostate cancer.

Conclusion

The actual opportunistic screening approach presents important deficiencies with displaced priorities in test performance and a low proportion of individuals undergoing recommended tests.

Keywords

Cancer Screening Breast Colon Rectum Melanoma Skin Cervix Prostate Prevention 

Copyright information

© Feseo 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Davide Mauri
    • 1
  • Antonis Valachis
    • 2
  • Nikolaos P. Polyzos
    • 3
  • Ivan Cortinovis
    • 4
  • Vassiliki Karampoiki
    • 5
  • Evridiki Loukidou
    • 6
  • Paraskevi Alevizaki
    • 7
  • Konstantinos Kamposioras
    • 8
  • Georgios Kouris
    • 9
  • Parthenopi Alexandropoulou
    • 9
  • Lamprini Tsali
    • 10
  • Charalampos Panou
    • 1
  • Athanasios Stamatelopoulos
    • 11
  • Velisarios Lakiotis
    • 12
  • Anastasia Spiliopoulou
    • 12
  • Aikaterini Terzoudi
    • 13
  • Aliki Ioakimidou
    • 14
  • Ioanna Karathanasi
    • 15
  • Magdalini Bristianou
    • 1
  • Giovanni Casazza
    • 3
  • Nicholas Pavlidis
    • 16
  1. 1.Department of Medical OncologyGeneral Hospital of LamiaLamiaGreece
  2. 2.Heraklion University HospitalHeraklion, CreteGreece
  3. 3.Obstetric and GynaecologyVolosGreece
  4. 4.Dipartimento di StatisticaUniversita’ degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  5. 5.Andrea Sigrou HospitalAthensGreece
  6. 6.Health Center of AntissasMitiliniGreece
  7. 7.Health Center of ChaniaChania, CreteGreece
  8. 8.Attiko University HospitalAthensGreece
  9. 9.General Hospital of LixouriCephaloniaGreece
  10. 10.Papageorgiou HospitalThessalonikiGreece
  11. 11.Erithros Stavros HospitalAthensGreece
  12. 12.University Hospital of PatraPatraGreece
  13. 13.Hospital of AlexandroupoliAlexandroupoliGreece
  14. 14.PACMeRThessalonikiGreece
  15. 15.Polykliniki General HospitalAthensGreece
  16. 16.Department of Medical OncologyIoannina University HospitalIoanninaGreece

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