Energy Efficiency

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 65–90 | Cite as

A methodological framework for comparative assessments of equipment energy efficiency policy measures

Original Article

Abstract

When government policy-makers propose new policies, they need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures to compare them to existing and alternative policies and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers’ budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. A useful methodology to perform such policy analysis should represent in a single framework the characteristics of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This paper presents an integrated methodological framework for the prospective assessment of the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of a variety of equipment energy efficiency policy measures. The framework is a comparative assessment tool for energy efficiency policy measures that (a) relies on a common set of primary data and parameters; (b) follows a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure; and (c) summarizes results in a set of metrics to facilitate comparative assessments. It provides a general methodology useful for evaluating a broad range of policies to promote greater equipment energy efficiency and the capability to further compare the impacts of such market interventions. The paper concludes with a demonstration of the use of the framework to compare the estimated impacts of 12 policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the USA.

Keywords

Energy efficiency policy Methodology Comparative assessment Energy efficiency standards Energy efficiency incentives 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Energy Efficiency Standards Group, Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies DivisionLawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryBerkeleyUSA

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