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Resonance

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 236–246 | Cite as

Ancient Indian mathematics — A conspectus

  • S. G. Dani
General / Article

Abstract

India has had a long tradition of more than 3000 years of pursuit of Mathematical ideas, starting from the Vedic age. The Sulvasutras (which included Pythagoras theorem before Pythagoras), the Jain works, the base 10 representation (along with the use of 0), names given to powers of 10 up to 1053, the works of medieval mathematicians motivated by astronomical studies, and finally the contributions of the Kerala school that came strikingly close to modern mathematics, represent the various levels of intellectual attainment.

Keywords

Sulvasutras Jain mathematics Siddhanta astronomy Bakhshali manuscript Kerala School of Mathematics 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of MathematicsTata Institute of Fundamental ResearchMumbaiIndia

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