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The first record of active methane (cold) seep ecosystem associated with shallow methane hydrate from the Indian EEZ

  • A Mazumdar
  • P Dewangan
  • A Peketi
  • S Gullapalli
  • M S Kalpana
  • G P Naik
  • D Shetty
  • S Pujari
  • S P K Pillutla
  • V V Gaikwad
  • D Nazareth
  • N S Sangodkar
  • G Dakara
  • A Kumar
  • C K Mishra
  • P Singha
  • R Reddy
Article

Abstract

Here we report the discovery of cold-seep ecosystem and shallow methane hydrates (2–3 mbsf) associated with methane gas flares in the water column from the Indian EEZ for the first time. The seep-sites are located in the Krishna–Godavari (K–G) basin at water depths of 900–1800 m and are characterized by gas flares in the water-column images. The occurrence of methane gas hydrates at very shallow depths (2–3 mbsf) at some of the seep-sites is attributed to high methane flux and conducive P–T conditions, necessary for the stability of methane hydrate. Chemosymbiont bearing Bivalves (Vesicomidae, Mytilidae, Thyasiridae and Solemyidae families); Polychaetes (Siboglinidae family) and Gastropods (Provannidae family) are also identified from seep-sites.

Keywords

Cold seep gas flares methane hydrate methane and hydrogen sulfide gases chemosymbiont 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the Director, CSIR–NIO and Secretary, MoES for supporting the gas hydrate program; National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) for scientific discussion, and background geology and ONGC for additional sites. Support from CSIR–NIO’s ship cell management team (Miliketan S Kerkar, M Kallathian, Kuldeep Kumar, Buddhadas Patole), Survey team (A W Gavin and S S Gaonker) and ship crew are sincerely acknowledged. Sincere thanks, Dr V V S S Sarma, Dr F Badesab and Dr M Rama Krishna for material support. Thanks to Mandar Nanajkar, Dr Ravail Singh, Mr Govardhan Sahu for useful discussion. This is CSIR–NIO contribution no. 6320.

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • A Mazumdar
    • 1
  • P Dewangan
    • 1
  • A Peketi
    • 1
  • S Gullapalli
    • 1
  • M S Kalpana
    • 2
  • G P Naik
    • 1
  • D Shetty
    • 1
  • S Pujari
    • 1
  • S P K Pillutla
    • 1
  • V V Gaikwad
    • 1
  • D Nazareth
    • 1
  • N S Sangodkar
    • 1
  • G Dakara
    • 1
  • A Kumar
    • 1
  • C K Mishra
    • 1
  • P Singha
    • 1
  • R Reddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Gas Hydrate Research Group, Geological OceanographyCSIR–National Institute of OceanographyDona PaulaIndia
  2. 2.CSIR–National Geophysical Research InstituteHyderabadIndia

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