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Geological, geochemical and Rb–Sr isotopic studies on tungsten mineralised Sewariya–Govindgarh granites of Delhi Fold Belt, Rajasthan, NW India

  • R Sivasubramaniam
  • Sundarrajan Vijay Anand
  • M S Pandian
  • S Balakrishnan
Article
  • 53 Downloads

Abstract

Neoproterozoic granites are widespread in the Delhi Fold Belt of the Aravalli craton, some of which are associated with tungsten mineralisation. In one such instance, the volcano-sedimentary sequence of Barotiya Group in the South Delhi Fold Belt is intruded by a pluton of biotite granite gneiss known as Sewariya Granite (SG) and later by stocks and dyke swarm of tourmaline leucogranite known as Govindgarh Granite (GG). GG magmatism was associated with wolframite mineralisation in hydrothermal quartz veins occurring along the sheared contact between SG pluton and Barotiya mica schist. SG pluton shows the evidence of ductile and brittle deformations, whereas GG is by and large undeformed. Apart from quartz and feldspars, SG contains biotite and muscovite, and GG contains muscovite, tourmaline and garnet. Although both SG and GG are peraluminous, SG has a wide range of \(\hbox {SiO}_{2}\) and narrow range of alkalis, and GG has a narrow range of \(\hbox {SiO}_{2}\) and a wide range of alkalis. REE (rare Earth elements) modelling shows that the parent magma of SG and GG was derived from partial melting at different crustal levels. Rb–Sr isotope data of GG yield a mineral isochron age of \(860\pm 7.4\,\hbox {Ma}\) which represent the time of igneous crystallisation and cooling of the granite to less than 400\({^{\circ }}\)C.

Keywords

Aravalli craton Delhi Supergroup S-type granite tungsten mineralisation geochemistry geochronology 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Scheme No. ESS/23/VES/034/98 of DST, New Delhi to MSP. Rb–Sr isotope analysis was carried out using the National Facility for Geochronology and Isotope Geosciences at Pondicherry University funded by DST-IRPHA. The authors are thankful to the reviewers and editor for the constructive comments and suggestions to improve the paper.

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Earth SciencesPondicherry UniversityPuducherryIndia
  2. 2.Atomic Minerals Directorate for Exploration and ResearchShillongIndia
  3. 3.Department of Earth SciencesEritrea Institute of TechnologyAsmaraEritrea

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