Journal of Earth System Science

, Volume 121, Issue 3, pp 559–593 | Cite as

A new atlas of temperature and salinity for the North Indian Ocean

  • A CHATTERJEE
  • D SHANKAR
  • S S C SHENOI
  • G V REDDY
  • G S MICHAEL
  • M RAVICHANDRAN
  • V V GOPALKRISHNA
  • E P RAMA RAO
  • T V S UDAYA BHASKAR
  • V N SANJEEVAN
Article

The most used temperature and salinity climatology for the world ocean, including the Indian Ocean, is the World Ocean Atlas (WOA) (Antonov et al 2006, 2010; Locarnini et al 2006, 2010) because of the vast amount of data used in its preparation. The WOA climatology does not, however, include all the available hydrographic data from the Indian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), leading to the potential for improvement if the data from this region are included to prepare a new climatology. We use all the data that went into the preparation of the WOA (Antonov et al 2010; Locarnini et al 2010), but add considerable data from Indian sources, to prepare new annual, seasonal, and monthly climatologies of temperature and salinity for the Indian Ocean. The addition of data improves the climatology considerably in the Indian EEZ, the differences between the new North Indian Ocean Atlas (NIOA) and WOA being most significant in the Bay of Bengal, where the patchiness seen in WOA, an artifact of the sparsity of data, was eliminated in NIOA. The significance of the new climatology is that it presents a more stable climatological value for the temperature and salinity fields in the Indian EEZ.

Keywords

Levitus atlas temperature climatology salinity climatology Indian Exclusive Economic Zone 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • A CHATTERJEE
    • 1
  • D SHANKAR
    • 1
  • S S C SHENOI
    • 2
  • G V REDDY
    • 1
  • G S MICHAEL
    • 1
  • M RAVICHANDRAN
    • 2
  • V V GOPALKRISHNA
    • 1
  • E P RAMA RAO
    • 2
  • T V S UDAYA BHASKAR
    • 2
  • V N SANJEEVAN
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research)GoaIndia
  2. 2.Indian National Centre for Ocean Information ServicesHyderabadIndia
  3. 3.Centre for Marine Living Resources and EcologyKochiIndia

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