Journal of Biosciences

, Volume 34, Issue 6, pp 829–833

The linguistic history of some Indian domestic plants

Commentary

Keywords

Indian domestic plants linguistic history 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sanskrit and Indian StudiesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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