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Journal of Biosciences

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 333–336 | Cite as

Observations on sporozoite detection in naturally infected sibling species of the Anopheles culicifacies complex and variant of Anopheles stephensi in India

  • Susanta Kumar GhoshEmail author
  • Satyanarayan Tiwari
  • Kamaraju Raghavendra
  • Tiruchinapalli Sundaraj Sathyanarayan
  • Aditya Prasad Dash
Brief Communication

Abstract

Sporozoites were detected in naturally infected sibling species of the primary rural vector Anopheles culicifacies complex in two primary health centres (PHCs) and a variant of the urban vector Anopheles stephensi in Mangalore city, Karnataka, south India while carrying out malaria outbreak investigations from 1998–2006. Sibling species of An. culicifacies were identified based on the banding patterns on ovarian polytene chromosomes, and variants of An. stephensi were identified based on the number of ridges on the egg floats. Sporozoites were detected in the salivary glands by the dissection method. Of the total 334 salivary glands of An. culicifacies dissected, 17 (5.08%) were found to be positive for sporozoites. Of the 17 positive samples, 11 were suitable for sibling species analysis; 10 were species A (an efficient vector) and 1 was species B (a poor vector). Out of 46 An. stephensi dissected, one was sporozoite positive and belonged to the type form (an efficient vector). In malaria epidemiology this observation is useful for planning an effective vector control programme, because each sibling species/variant differs in host specificity, susceptibility to malarial parasites, breeding habitats and response to insecticides.

Keywords

An. culicifacies sibling species An. stephensi variants malaria sporozoites 

Abbreviations used

EIR

entomological inoculation rates

ELISA

enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

NAMP

National Anti Malaria Programme

NMEP

National Malaria Eradication Programme

NVBDCP

National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme

P

Plasmodium

PCR

polymerase chain reaction

PHC

primary health centre

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanta Kumar Ghosh
    • 1
    Email author
  • Satyanarayan Tiwari
    • 1
  • Kamaraju Raghavendra
    • 2
  • Tiruchinapalli Sundaraj Sathyanarayan
    • 1
  • Aditya Prasad Dash
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of Malaria Research (ICMR)Epidemic Diseases HospitalBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.National Institute of Malaria Research (ICMR)DelhiIndia

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