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Molecular Biotechnology

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 105–112 | Cite as

Identification of Tumor-Associated Antigens from Medullary Breast Carcinoma by a Modified SEREX Approach

  • Ramziya Kiyamova
  • Olga Kostianets
  • Sergey Malyuchik
  • Valeriy Filonenko
  • Vasiliy Usenko
  • Vadym Gurtovyy
  • Yuliya Khozayenko
  • Stepan Antonuk
  • Lloyd Old
  • Ivan Gout
Research

Abstract

Medullary breast carcinoma (MBC) is a relatively rare malignancy with heavy lymphocytic infiltration that despite cytologically anaplastic features and high mitotic index has more favorable prognosis than other types of breast cancer. Lymphocytic infiltration of tumors reflects ongoing immune response against tumor antigens which could represent a great interest as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. The search for MBC antigens by SEREX methodology has not been successful due to a very high titer of false positive clones, representing immunoglobulin genes. Here, we describe a novel approach for generating cDNA expression libraries from MBC tumor samples which are depleted of IgG cDNA clones and, therefore, are suitable for the identification of novel tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by SEREX approach. Modified methodology allowed us to isolate a panel of known and novel TAA which are currently under further investigation.

Keywords

Medullary breast carcinoma cDNA expression library SEREX Tumor-associated antigens Cancer immunotherapy and diagnostics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported in part by a grant from the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the UICC fellowship to carry out some experiments on this project at University College London (UCL), United Kingdom.

Conflicts of Interest Statement

The authors declare no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramziya Kiyamova
    • 1
  • Olga Kostianets
    • 1
  • Sergey Malyuchik
    • 1
  • Valeriy Filonenko
    • 1
  • Vasiliy Usenko
    • 2
  • Vadym Gurtovyy
    • 2
  • Yuliya Khozayenko
    • 2
  • Stepan Antonuk
    • 3
  • Lloyd Old
    • 4
  • Ivan Gout
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Cell SignalingInstitute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NAS of UkraineKyivUkraine
  2. 2.Research and Production Center, Medical TechnologiesDnipropetrovskUkraine
  3. 3.Dnipropetrovsk Municipal Clinical Hospital No. 4DnipropetrovskUkraine
  4. 4.Ludwig Institute for Cancer ResearchNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Research Department of Structural and Molecular BiologyUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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