Molecular Biotechnology

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 69–77

Metabolic Rates, Growth Phase, and mRNA Levels Influence Cell-Specific Antibody Production Levels from In Vitro-Cultured Mammalian Cells at Sub-Physiological Temperatures

  • Rosalyn J. Marchant
  • Mohamed B. Al-Fageeh
  • Michele F. Underhill
  • Andrew J. Racher
  • C. Mark Smales
Research

DOI: 10.1007/s12033-008-9032-0

Cite this article as:
Marchant, R.J., Al-Fageeh, M.B., Underhill, M.F. et al. Mol Biotechnol (2008) 39: 69. doi:10.1007/s12033-008-9032-0

Abstract

Previous work has shown that recombinant protein yield can be improved from in vitro-cultured mammalian cells by culturing at sub-physiological temperatures, although this effect is cell line and product dependent. The mechanism(s) by which low temperature leads to enhanced product yield are currently unknown; however, recent reports suggest that increased mRNA levels at sub-physiological temperatures may be largely responsible for this. Here, we have investigated whether low-temperature cultivation of cell lines selected for antibody production at 37°C leads to changes in heavy- and light-chain mRNA levels and if this is reflected in antibody yields. Low-temperature in vitro culturing resulted in reduced viable cell concentration, prolonged cell viability, a reduction in metabolite consumption and production, cell cycle arrest in both CHO and NS0 cells, and changes in the levels of heavy- and light-chain mRNA. Despite increases in the level of heavy- and light-chain mRNA upon culturing at 32°C in our model CHO cell line, this did not result in increased total product yield; however, changes in cell-specific yields were observed that reflected the metabolic rate of glucose utilization and changes in mRNA levels.

Keywords

Cold-shock Sub-physiological temperature culturing CHO NS0 mRNA levels Monoclonal antibody production 

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalyn J. Marchant
    • 1
  • Mohamed B. Al-Fageeh
    • 1
  • Michele F. Underhill
    • 1
  • Andrew J. Racher
    • 2
  • C. Mark Smales
    • 1
  1. 1.Protein Science Group, Department of BiosciencesUniversity of KentCanterburyUK
  2. 2.Lonza Biologics plcSloughUK

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