Medical Oncology

, 34:46 | Cite as

Use of an alpha lipoic, methylsulfonylmethane and bromelain dietary supplement (Opera®) for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy management, a prospective study

  • Isacco Desideri
  • Giulio Francolini
  • Carlotta Becherini
  • Francesca Terziani
  • Camilla Delli Paoli
  • Emanuela Olmetto
  • Mauro Loi
  • Marco Perna
  • Icro Meattini
  • Vieri Scotti
  • Daniela Greto
  • Pierluigi Bonomo
  • Susanna Sulprizio
  • Lorenzo Livi
Original Paper

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major clinical problem associated with a number of cytotoxic agents. OPERA® (GAMFARMA srl, Milan, Italy) is a new dietary supplement where α-lipoic acid, Boswellia Serrata, methylsulfonylmethane and bromelain are combined in a single capsule. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the efficacy and safety of OPERA® supplementation in a series of patients affected by CIPN. We selected 25 subjects with CIPN evolving during or after chemotherapy with potentially neurotoxic agents. Patients were enrolled at the first clinical manifestation of neuropathy. CIPN was assessed at the enrollment visit and subsequently repeated every 3 weeks until 12 weeks. Primary endpoint was the evaluation of changes of measured scores after 12 weeks of therapy compared to baseline evaluation. Secondary endpoints were the evaluation of neuropathy reduction at 12 weeks after beginning of therapy with OPERA®. Analysis of VAS data showed reduction in pain perceived by patients. According to NCI-CTC sensor and motor score, mISS scale and TNSc scale, both pain and both sensor and motor neuropathic impairment decreased after 12 weeks of treatments. Treatment with OPERA supplement was well tolerated; no increase in the toxicity profile of any of the therapeutic regimen that the patients were undergoing was reported. OPERA® was able to improve CIPN symptoms in a prospective series of patients treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy, with no significant toxicity or interaction. Prospective RCT in a selected patients’ population is warranted to confirm its promising activity.

Keywords

Neuropathy Management Dietary supplement Neurotoxic chemotherapy 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee (“Comitato Etico Area Vasta Centro”) and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isacco Desideri
    • 1
  • Giulio Francolini
    • 2
  • Carlotta Becherini
    • 2
  • Francesca Terziani
    • 2
  • Camilla Delli Paoli
    • 2
  • Emanuela Olmetto
    • 2
  • Mauro Loi
    • 2
  • Marco Perna
    • 2
  • Icro Meattini
    • 2
  • Vieri Scotti
    • 2
  • Daniela Greto
    • 2
  • Pierluigi Bonomo
    • 2
  • Susanna Sulprizio
    • 2
  • Lorenzo Livi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical SciencesUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria CareggiUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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