Medical Oncology

, 30:434 | Cite as

Paclitaxel and bevacizumab in first-line treatment for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer: single-center experience

  • Lorenzo Livi
  • Pierluigi Bonomo
  • Icro Meattini
  • Gabriele Simontacchi
  • Daniela Greto
  • Isacco Desideri
  • Fiammetta Meacci
  • Vieri Scotti
  • Sara Cecchini
  • Jacopo Nori
  • Luis Jose Sanchez
  • Lorenzo Orzalesi
  • Fabiola Paiar
  • Gianpaolo Biti
Short Communication

Abstract

The aim of our analysis was to report the outcome and safety of patients treated with bevacizumab and paclitaxel as first-line treatment for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. Between February 2009 and August 2011, 62 consecutive patients received paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 and bevacizumab (BV) 10 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15, every 28-day cycle. After 6 cycles of combined treatment, patients were given maintenance BV every 3 weeks (15 mg/kg) until progression disease or unacceptable toxicity. At time of analysis, median overall survival was 12.3 months (range 4.6–44.8 months), progression-free survival was 8.1 months (range 2.3–33.2 months), and time to treatment failure was 8.4 months (range 2.3–33.2 months). Our results confirmed the efficacy and the acceptable toxicity profile of bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line regimen for metastatic breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast cancer Metastatic breast carcinoma Bevacizumab Paclitaxel Chemotherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was not funded by any source, and the authors have nothing to disclose

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorenzo Livi
    • 1
  • Pierluigi Bonomo
    • 1
  • Icro Meattini
    • 2
  • Gabriele Simontacchi
    • 2
  • Daniela Greto
    • 2
  • Isacco Desideri
    • 2
  • Fiammetta Meacci
    • 2
  • Vieri Scotti
    • 2
  • Sara Cecchini
    • 2
  • Jacopo Nori
    • 3
  • Luis Jose Sanchez
    • 4
  • Lorenzo Orzalesi
    • 4
  • Fabiola Paiar
    • 2
  • Gianpaolo Biti
    • 2
  1. 1.Radiotherapy Unit, IFCAUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Radiation Oncology Department, AOUCUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  3. 3.Diagnostic Senology UnitUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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