Medical Oncology

, Volume 27, Issue 2, pp 430–433 | Cite as

Gemcitabine and lenalidomide combination in a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case study

Original Paper

Abstract

The proportion of people surviving pancreatic cancer is extremely low, with just 10% of patients diagnosed with any stage of the disease living beyond 1 year and a 5-year relative survival rate of <5%. The lack of effective therapy is one the main reason for such a bleak outlook. Herein, we report on a patient with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and metastatic disease treated with a combination regimen of gemcitabine and lenalidomide, without major complications. We also present in vitro data that highlight a hyper-additive effect of the two drugs when used in combination. To date, 33 months after diagnosis, the patient remains well and continues in full-time employment.

Keywords

Pancreatic cancer Drug combination therapy Gemcitabine Lenalidomide 

References

  1. 1.
    Jemal A, Siegel R, Ward E, Hao Y, Xu J, Murray T, et al. Cancer statistics, 2008. CA Cancer J Clin. 2008;58:71–96. doi: 10.3322/CA.2007.0010.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hariharan D, Saied A, Kocher HM. Analysis of mortality rates for pancreatic cancer across the world. HPB (Oxford). 2008;10:58–62.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
    Fryer RA, Galustian C, Dalgleish AG. Recent advances and developments in treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2009;4:102–12.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Burris HA 3rd, Moore MJ, Andersen J, Green MR, Rothenberg ML, Modiano MR, et al. Improvements in survival and clinical benefit with gemcitabine as first-line therapy for patients with advanced pancreas cancer: a randomized trial. J Clin Oncol. 1997;15:2403–13.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Li D, Xie K, Wolff R, Abbruzzese JL. Pancreatic cancer. Lancet. 2004;363:1049–57. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(04)15841-8.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bartlett JB, Michael A, Clarke IA, Dredge K, Nicholson S, Kristeleit H, et al. Phase I study to determine the safety, tolerability and immunostimulatory activity of thalidomide analogue CC-5013 in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma and other advanced cancers. Br J Cancer. 2004;90:955–61. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6601579.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Liu WM. Enhancing the cytotoxic activity of novel targeted therapies—is there a role for a combinatorial approach? Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2008;3:108–17. doi: 10.2174/157488408784293714.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bronte V, Apolloni E, Cabrelle A, Ronca R, Serafini P, Zamboni P, et al. Identification of a CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+)/CD31(+) myeloid progenitor capable of activating or suppressing CD8(+) T cells. Blood. 2000;96:3838–46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Serafini P, De Santo C, Marigo I, Cingarlini S, Dolcetti L, Gallina G, et al. Derangement of immune responses by myeloid suppressor cells. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 2004;53:64–72. doi: 10.1007/s00262-003-0443-2.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Suzuki E, Kapoor V, Jassar AS, Kaiser LR, Albelda SM. Gemcitabine selectively eliminates splenic Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid suppressor cells in tumor-bearing animals and enhances antitumor immune activity. Clin Cancer Res. 2005;11:6713–21. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-0883.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bartlett JB, Dredge K, Dalgleish AG. The evolution of thalidomide and its IMiD derivatives as anticancer agents. Nat Rev Cancer. 2004;4:314–22. doi: 10.1038/nrc1323.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oncology, Division of Cellular and Molecular MedicineSt. George’s University of LondonLondonUK

Personalised recommendations