Medical Oncology

, 26:143 | Cite as

Prostate-specific antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid: A marker of local disease

  • George Orphanos
  • George Ioannidis
  • Michael Michael
  • George Kitrou
Original Paper

Abstract

Leptomeningeal involvement from prostate cancer is a rare complication with dismal prognosis. Prostate-specific antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid may be found elevated and can be used as a marker for local disease. We present the case of a patient with prostate cancer and leptomeningeal metastases who had high levels of prostate-specific antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid.

Keywords

Prostate cancer Prostate-specific antigen Leptomeningeal metastasis 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Orphanos
    • 1
  • George Ioannidis
    • 1
  • Michael Michael
    • 2
  • George Kitrou
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OncologyNicosia General HospitalNicosiaCyprus
  2. 2.Department of CytopathologyNicosia General HospitalNicosiaCyprus

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