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Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

, Volume 59, Issue 4, pp 579–589 | Cite as

Effects of Chronic Scopolamine Treatment on Cognitive Impairments and Myelin Basic Protein Expression in the Mouse Hippocampus

  • Joon Ha Park
  • Hyun Young Choi
  • Jeong-Hwi Cho
  • In Hye Kim
  • Tae-Kyeong Lee
  • Jae-Chul Lee
  • Moo-Ho WonEmail author
  • Bai Hui Chen
  • Bich-Na Shin
  • Ji Hyeon Ahn
  • Hyun-Jin Tae
  • Jung Hoon Choi
  • Jin-Young Chung
  • Choong-Hyun Lee
  • Jun Hwi Cho
  • Il Jun Kang
  • Jong-Dai KimEmail author
Article

Abstract

Myelin plays an important role in learning and memory, and degradation of myelin is a key feature in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders involving cognitive dysfunction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is one of the most abundant structural proteins in myelin and is essential for myelin formation and compaction. In this study, we first examined changes in the distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers and MBP levels according to hippocampal subregion in mice following chronic systemic treatment with 1 mg/kg scopolamine (SCO) for 4 weeks. We found that SCO-induced cognitive impairments, as assayed by the water maze and passive avoidance tests, were significantly reduced 1 week after SCO treatment and the impairments were maintained without any hippocampal neuronal loss. MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers were easily detected in the stratum radiatum and lacunosum-moleculare of the hippocampus proper (CA1–3 region) and in the molecular and polymorphic layers of the dentate gyrus. The distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was not altered 1 week after SCO treatment. However, the density of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was significantly decreased 2 weeks after SCO treatment; thereafter, the density gradually, though not significantly, decreased with time. In addition, the changing pattern of MBP levels in the hippocampus following SCO treatment corresponded to immunohistochemical changes. In brief, this study shows that chronic systemic treatment with SCO induced significant degradation of MBP in the hippocampus without neuronal loss at least 2 weeks after SCO treatment, although cognitive impairments occurred 1 week after SCO treatment.

Keywords

Scopolamine Cognitive deficit Hippocampus proper Dentate gyrus Myelinated nerve fibers Myelin basic protein 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Mr. Seung Uk Lee for his technical help in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (NO2011-0022812), and by the Bio-Synergy Research Project (NRF-2015M3A9C4076322) of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning through the National Research Foundation.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no potential conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Ha Park
    • 1
  • Hyun Young Choi
    • 2
  • Jeong-Hwi Cho
    • 1
  • In Hye Kim
    • 1
  • Tae-Kyeong Lee
    • 1
  • Jae-Chul Lee
    • 1
  • Moo-Ho Won
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bai Hui Chen
    • 3
  • Bich-Na Shin
    • 3
  • Ji Hyeon Ahn
    • 4
  • Hyun-Jin Tae
    • 4
  • Jung Hoon Choi
    • 5
  • Jin-Young Chung
    • 6
  • Choong-Hyun Lee
    • 7
  • Jun Hwi Cho
    • 8
  • Il Jun Kang
    • 9
  • Jong-Dai Kim
    • 10
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Neurobiology, School of MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Emergency Medicine, Gangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of MedicineHallym UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, and Institute of Neurodegeneration and NeuroregenerationHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  4. 4.Department of Biomedical Science, Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  5. 5.Department of Anatomy, College of Veterinary MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  6. 6.Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  7. 7.Department of Pharmacy, College of PharmacyDankook UniversityCheonanSouth Korea
  8. 8.Department of Emergency Medicine, School of MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  9. 9.Department of Food Science and NutritionHallym UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea
  10. 10.Division of Food Biotechnology, School of BiotechnologyKangwon National UniversityChuncheonSouth Korea

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