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Immunologic Research

, Volume 64, Issue 4, pp 1033–1040 | Cite as

Specific immunotherapy generates CD8+ CD196+ T cells to suppress lung cancer growth in mice

  • Jian Zhang
  • Jing Liu
  • Huiguo Chen
  • Weibin Wu
  • Xiaojun Li
  • Yonghui Wu
  • Zhigang Wang
  • Kai Zhang
  • Yun Li
  • Yimin Weng
  • Hongying Liao
  • Lijia GuEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

That specific immunotherapy can inhibit cancer growth has been recognized; its efficiency is to be improved. This study aimed to inhibit lung cancer (LC) growth in a mouse model by using an LC-specific vaccination. In this study, a LC mouse model was created by adoptive transplantation with LC cells. The tumor-bearing mice were vaccinated with LC cell extracts plus adjuvant TNBS or adoptive transplantation with specific CD8+ CD196+ T cells. The results showed that the vaccination with LC extracts (LCE)/TNBS markedly inhibited the LC growth and induced CD8+ CD196+ T cells in LC tissue and the spleen. These CD8+ CD196+ T cells proliferated and produce high levels of perforin upon exposure to LCE and specifically induced LC cell apoptosis. Exposure to TNBS induced RAW264.7 cells to produce macrophage inflammatory protein-3α; the latter activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and further induced perforin expression in the CD8+ CD196+ T cells. Adoptive transfer with specific CD8+ CD196+ T cells suppressed LC growth in mice. In conclusion, immunization with LC extracts and TNBS can induce LC-specific CD8+ CD196+ T cells in LC-bearing mice and inhibit LC growth.

Keywords

LC Specific immunotherapy Vaccination Mouse model T helper cell 

Notes

Author contributions

JZ, JL, HC, WW, XL, YW, ZW, KZ, YL, YW and HL performed experiments, analyzed data and reviewed the manuscript. LG designed the project, supervised the research and wrote the paper.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jian Zhang
    • 1
  • Jing Liu
    • 2
  • Huiguo Chen
    • 1
  • Weibin Wu
    • 1
  • Xiaojun Li
    • 1
  • Yonghui Wu
    • 1
  • Zhigang Wang
    • 1
  • Kai Zhang
    • 1
  • Yun Li
    • 1
  • Yimin Weng
    • 1
  • Hongying Liao
    • 1
  • Lijia Gu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Thoracic Surgery DepartmentThe Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Infectious Disease DepartmentThe Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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