Immunologic Research

, Volume 48, Issue 1–3, pp 84–98

The use of cell-delivered gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS

  • Geoff P. Symonds
  • Helen A. Johnstone
  • Michelle L. Millington
  • Maureen P. Boyd
  • Bryan P. Burke
  • Louis R. Breton
Article

Abstract

HIV/AIDS is a disease that impairs immune function, primarily by decreasing T-lymphocyte count. Its progression can be contained by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but there are side effects that can be severe, and the development of resistance often forces the physician to modify the HAART regimen. There are no vaccines available for HIV. An alternative approach that could provide a path to a curative therapy is the use of cell-delivered gene therapy in which an anti-HIV gene(s) is introduced into hematopoietic cells to produce a population that is protected from the effects of HIV. In this paper, we review the field and discuss an approach using a short hairpin RNA to CCR5, an important co-receptor for HIV.

Keywords

HIV/AIDS HIV gene therapy Short hairpin RNA to CCR5 Cell-delivered gene therapy HIV resistance 

Abbreviations

HAART

Highly active antiretroviral therapy

HIV

Human immunodeficiency virus

AIDS

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

shRNA

Short hairpin RNA

CCR5

C–C chemokine receptor type 5

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoff P. Symonds
    • 1
  • Helen A. Johnstone
    • 2
  • Michelle L. Millington
    • 1
  • Maureen P. Boyd
    • 1
  • Bryan P. Burke
    • 1
  • Louis R. Breton
    • 3
  1. 1.Visiting Scientist, UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular GeneticsUCLA AIDS InstituteLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Calimmune AustraliaSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Calimmune IncLos AngelesUSA

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