Immunologic Research

, 41:248 | Cite as

Foxp3 and Treg cells in HIV-1 infection and immuno-pathogenesis

Article

Abstract

FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are implicated in a number of pathologic processes including elevated levels in cancers and infectious diseases, and reduced levels in autoimmune diseases. Treg cells are activated to modulate immune responses to avoid over-reactive immunity. However, conflicting findings are reported regarding relative levels of Treg cells during HIV-1 infection and disease progression. The role of Treg cells in HIV-1 diseases (aberrant immune activation) is poorly understood due to lack of a robust model. We summarize here the regulation and function of Foxp3 in Treg cells and in modulating HIV-1 replication. Based on recent findings from SIV/monkey and HIV/humanized mouse models, a model of the dual role of Treg cells in HIV-1 infection and immuno-pathogenesis is discussed.

Keywords

Regulatory T cells AIDS Chromatin Epigenetic Humanized mouse DKO-hu ONTAK 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek Holmes
    • 1
  • Qi Jiang
    • 1
  • Liguo Zhang
    • 1
  • Lishan Su
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of MedicineThe University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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