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Endocrine

pp 1–6 | Cite as

A review of the propriety of thyroid ultrasound referrals and their follow-up burden

  • Colin DavenportEmail author
  • Jack Alderson
  • Ivan G. Yu
  • Aoiffe C Magner
  • Diarmuid M. O’Brien
  • Meabh Ni Ghiollagain
  • Sinead Kileen
  • Mark Heneghan
  • Muna Sabah
  • Eamon Leen
  • John H. McDermott
  • Seamus Sreenan
  • Neil Hickey
  • Tommy Kyaw-Tun
Original Article
  • 41 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

The overdiagnosis of thyroid nodules and indolent thyroid cancers represents an increasing burden on health services, with thyroid ultrasound (US) imaging often representing the initial entry point into the thyroid nodule diagnostic pathway. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review thyroid US referrals to a single Irish hospital to determine if the stated indications for imaging had been appropriate, to review the results of the scans, and to assess the follow-up required in each case.

Methods

Patient demographics, scan indications, results, and outcomes were retrospectively reviewed for all patients undergoing thyroid ultrasound from 2012 to 2016. Data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism and expressed in mean ± standard deviation.

Results

In total, 318 patients (mean age 53 ± 15 years, 85% female) had at least one ultrasound. Most US scans were performed for appropriate indications in order to follow up known thyroid nodular disease and/or malignancy (34.3%), to assess new thyroid goiters or discrete neck lumps (33.3%), and to follow up incidental findings from other imaging modalities (12.6%). However, scans were also requested (in the absence of any palpable goiter or mass) for choking/neck pain/swallowing complaints (12.3%), hypo/hyperthyroidism (6.6%), and miscellaneous reasons (0.6%) that were deemed either potentially or likely inappropriate. Of these scans, approximately half of the identified nodule(s) were deemed unlikely to be related to the stated symptoms, but which subsequently required follow-up imaging ± biopsy. No cases of malignancy were identified.

Conclusions

In our center, a significant percentage of thyroid US scans along with their subsequent follow-up were potentially avoidable.

Keywords

Thyroid ultrasound Thyroid nodule Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Fine-needle aspiration Thyroid cancer Goiter 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interests.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

For this type of study format, consent was not required.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Davenport
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jack Alderson
    • 1
  • Ivan G. Yu
    • 1
  • Aoiffe C Magner
    • 1
  • Diarmuid M. O’Brien
    • 1
  • Meabh Ni Ghiollagain
    • 1
  • Sinead Kileen
    • 1
  • Mark Heneghan
    • 1
  • Muna Sabah
    • 2
  • Eamon Leen
    • 2
  • John H. McDermott
    • 1
  • Seamus Sreenan
    • 1
  • Neil Hickey
    • 3
  • Tommy Kyaw-Tun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EndocrinologyConnolly HospitalBlanchardstown, Co DublinIreland
  2. 2.Department of PathologyConnolly HospitalBlanchardstown, Co DublinIreland
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyConnolly HospitalBlanchardstown, Co DublinIreland

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